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January 31 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Seven Reasons Cheap Oil Can’t Stop Renewables Now” – Oil prices have fallen by more than half since July. Just five years ago, this would have put the renewable-energy industry on bankruptcy watch. Here are seven reasons why humanity’s transition to cleaner energy won’t be sidetracked by cheap oil. [Bloomberg]
  • Eos Energy Storage will be making its MW-scale Aurora system commercially available starting in 2016 at a price of $160/kWh, according to a recent press release. The company’s standard offering is a containerized 1-MW DC battery system that can provide roughly 4 hours of continuous discharge for cost-effective energy storage. [CleanTechnica]
  • The government of the Indian state of Karnataka might not consider any more thermal power projects in future, the energy minister said. He warned that the summer might be tough because of coal mining licence cancellations by the Supreme Court. He pegs his hopes on renewable energy, especially solar power. [The New Indian Express]
  • Over the course of last year the electricity generated from solar installations across the UK almost doubled. Official data finds that at the end of 2014 solar generated almost 5 GW, up from 2.8 GW at the end of 2013. The latest figure is enough power to supply 1.5 million homes across the country. [Blue & Green Tomorrow]
  • Not only is demand for electric power in the US falling, but competition from renewable energy sources is growing. In the past few years, that competition is not just from other large power producers, but from utility customers themselves. The rising opportunity for consumers is a problem for utilities. [Huffington Post]

For more news, please visit geoharvey - Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

January 30 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • A series of graphs shows how the German Energiewende renewable targets are on track, have lowered emissions, decoupled energy consumption from economic growth, pushed wholesale prices down to record lows, and are now pushing retail prices down. Interesting things are happening to the energy mix. [RenewEconomy]
  • Countries from Mexico to Germany and Malaysia are increasingly taking advantage of cheap oil by trimming fossil-fuel subsidies, easing the way for renewable power that can help the environment. The IEA’s latest report says fossil fuel producers were paid $548 billion in 2013, a $26.5 billion decline. [Bloomberg]
  • New figures released by GTM Research show that the Latin America solar PV market grew by 370% in 2014, installing a total of 625 MW. In the fourth quarter of 2014 alone, Chile installed double the amount of Latin America’s annual solar PV total in 2013. Projections are for 2.1 GW of PV installed in 2015. [CleanTechnica]
  • Renewable energy production has outperformed natural gas resources, contributing nearly half of new generating capacity in the US in 2014. Various renewable energy sources such as biomass, geothermal, hydroelectric, solar and wind contributed 49.81% of new capacity. Natural gas accounted for 48.65%. [Greentech Lead]
  • The Atomic Safety and Licensing Board denied the state of Vermont’s request for a hearing designed to force Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee and Entergy Nuclear Operations to maintain an operational status regarding its Site Emergency Plan. [Nuclear Street – Nuclear Power Plant News, Jobs, and Careers]

For more news, please visit geoharvey - Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

Business Continuity Workshop for Regional Economic Resiliency.

There will be a public workshop on Tuesday February 3rd from 7:00-11:00 am at the Hypertherm Facility, 71 Heater Road, Lebanon NH.

LEBANON, NH (January 5, 2015) – The impact of a severe weather event is sometimes quantified by the loss of life and property. Often, these events can have lasting economic impacts on the region’s businesses, communities, and livelihood. Severe weather and other unexpected events disrupt the operations, supply chains, and workflow for local businesses, which can result in lost productivity and jobs. The Upper Valley Adaptation Workgroup (UVAW) will be hosting a workshop for local businesses to learn more about resiliency planning with a free Business Continuity Workshop the morning of February 3, 2015 at the Hypertherm facility at 71 Heater Road in Lebanon, New Hampshire.

“UVAW was formed three years ago to promote regional resiliency and adaptation to climate change issues,” says UVAW Co-Chair Alex Jaccaci, “This workshop will focus on helping local businesses prepare for increasingly severe and unpredictable weather events.” This workshop is possible thanks to UVAW’s local partners, the National Association of Development Organizations and the US Economic Development Administration.

This workshop will provide business owners with practical and interactive instruction about economic resiliency and business continuity. The workshop will culminate in an exercise for each participant to identify and discuss likely vulnerabilities to operations and supply chains and how to address the problems with help from national and regional economic resiliency experts.

This event will also kick-off risk and vulnerability assessments for eight regional businesses and organizations through a partnership with Professor Amy Seidl, PhD, at the University of Vermont Environmental Studies Department. “Our students will be applying concepts in climate adaptation,” explains Dr. Seidl, “as consultants to local Upper Valley commercial and non-profit groups to develop ‘continuity of operation’ plans this coming spring.” Local UVAW partners, who are themselves experts in climate adaptation, will serve as local technical consultants for this UVM community service project.

Business Continuity Workshop

When: Tuesday February 3, 2015
Where: Hypertherm, 71 Heater Road, Lebanon, NH
Time: 7:00 AM to 7:30 AM – Registration and Breakfast (thanks to Simbex), 7:30 AM to 11:00 AM – Resiliency Workshop
Registration Required: Visit HTTP://TINYURL.COM/UVRESILIENCY to register for the event.

Event Sponsors: Upper Valley Adaptation Workgroup, National Association of Development Organizations, US Economic Development Administration, Hypertherm, Inc., and Simbex

Contact:
Alex Jaccaci, Co-Chair, Upper Valley Adaptation Workgroup
Michael McCrory, Senior Planner, UVLSRPC

Sanders’ Solar Bill Blocked by Senate Republicans

senator-Bernie-SandersWASHINGTON, Jan. 28 – Senate Republicans today shot down a proposal by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) to help install up to 10 million solar power systems for homes and businesses in the coming decade.

Rebates for solar systems would have been authorized by a Sanders amendment to a Keystone XL oil pipeline bill now before the Senate.

“The scientific community tells us very clearly if we’re going to reverse climate change and the great dangers it poses for the planet we must move aggressively to transform our energy system away from fossil fuels to energy efficiency and sustainable energy,” Sanders said.

His amendment called for a 15 percent rebate to homeowners and businesses that install solar power. The new solar power generated would have been enough to replace one-fifth of the nation’s dirty, coal-fired power plants. The measure also would create new jobs.

“So if you’re interested in reversing the dangers of climate change and creating jobs, I would urge you to support this amendment,” Sanders said. The amendment got 40 votes.  It needed 60 to pass.

Sanders’ proposal was supported by Vermont’s Green Mountain Power, a leading proponent of solar and other renewable sources of energy.  “Green Mountain Power is finding new ways to help Vermonters save money and be more comfortable, while moving to cleaner local sources of energy,” said Mary Powell, the utility president. “We appreciate the efforts of leaders like Sen. Sanders and others who recognize the importance of ongoing investments in renewable energy.”

Contact: Michael Briggs (202) 224-5141

January 29 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • Large-scale wind projects are the most cost-effective way for Vermont utilities to meet proposed new renewable energy requirements being considered by the Legislature, according to testimony. A bill backed by the Shumlin Administration would have 55% of the power come from renewable sources by 2017. [Vermont Public Radio]
  • Conversion to hydrogen can provide a store for all of the excess electricity produced by the renewable industry, according to a report. It also points to a huge potential power to gas storage industry, with the European energy storage potential for electrolysis estimated at several hundred gigawatts. [Proactive Investors UK]
  • IKEA this week revealed demand for its greenest products jumped 58% last year to over €1 billion as consumers purchased such products as LED lighting, solar panels, and water-saving taps. Products that help customers achieve “a more sustainable life at home” are a major growth area for the company. [Business Green]
  • A UK village made famous after strong anti-fracking protests has installed the first community-owned solar panel project. Residents from Balcome, West Sussex set up an energy co-operative after the protests. The co-op has installed a total of 69 panels on the roof of a cow-shed at a nearby family-run farm. [E&T magazine]
  • The Scottish government has announced that it will place a temporary ban on the controversial practice of hydraulic fracturing, better known as fracking. The Scottish energy minister told the country’s parliament that the ban would allow for time for the government to conduct a public health assessment. [ThinkProgress]

For more news, please visit geoharvey - Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

NESEA Speakers at BuildingEnergy 15: Howard J. Brown

Dematerialization Applied

Howard J. Brown

Thursday, March 05, 2015
8:30 am to 10:00 am
Multi-Sector

As a follow-up to “Dematerializing Buildings” at BE14, this session will explore how the dematerialization and lightweighting of buildings is being put into practice. Many of the technologies discussed in the March 2014 session are now being put into actual application while more new technologies are entering the pipeline at a rapid rate. Driven by energy and environmental concerns, some projects are now quantifying the material savings and embodied carbon reduction resulting from lightweighting strategies. The speakers will describe the progress of dematerialization and its real impact on design, engineering, and construction. This will include case studies of technologies that have gained market acceptance and projects that have actively embraced them. Attendees will be encouraged to engage in an interactive discussion of techniques for incorporating resource-efficient products to improve building performance, durability, and resilience.

Learn more at: http://www.dmass.net

 

January 28 Energy News

Headline News:

  • The Obama administration released a draft five-year plan for oil and gas lease sales that would open areas of the Atlantic Ocean and offshore Alaska to drilling. The draft plan includes 14 potential lease sales in eight planning areas, ten in the Gulf of Mexico, three off Alaskan coasts, and one off Virginia through South Carolina. [Huffington Post]
  • Global nuclear power capacity increased slightly in 2014. Five new reactors (4.76 gigawatts) began supplying electricity and three were permanently shut down. Nuclear generating capacity increased by 2.4 GW, compared to 26 GW for windpower. Thus a long-standing pattern of stagnation continues. [Business Spectator]
  • The world can enjoy higher standards of living and more travel, while drastically cutting emissions to avoid dangerous climate change, but only with sweeping changes to our infrastructure, the natural world, and agriculture, and continuation of poverty for many, UK Government analysis has found. [Greenwise Business]
  • The Vermont Public Service Department has awarded two Vermont-based companies, Casella Resource Solutions, Rutland, and Grow Compost, Waterbury, with Clean Energy Development Fund grants to build and operate pilot projects to demonstrate the feasibility of anaerobic digestion of food scraps. [Renewable Energy from Waste]
  • US tight oil production from shale plays will fall faster than most assume. High decline rates from shale reservoirs is one reason. But also, every rig used in pad drilling has approximately three times the impact on the daily production rate as a rig did before pad drilling. Well productivity has decreased by about a third. [Resilience]

For more news, please visit geoharvey - Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

NESEA Speakers at BuildingEnergy 15:

Chris Benedict

Chris Benedict

Chris Benedict, Paul Eldrenkamp, Thomas Hartman, Heather Nolen, Andy Shapiro

Paul Eldrenkamp

Paul Eldrenkamp

Lessons from Scandinavia (Part 1)

Thursday, March 05, 2015
10:30 am to 12:00 pm
Multi-Sector

Paul, Chris, Andy, Tom and Heather went to Scandinavia to learn about what the Swedes and Danes are doing about climate change.

Thomas Hartman

Thomas Hartman

In two sessions, we’ll present what we learned in visiting buildings, building professionals, city officials, and researchers in these two countries, and how it may or may not relate to our efforts here at home.

Lessons from Scandinavia (Part 2)

Thursday, March 05, 2015

Heather Nolen

Heather Nolen

2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Multi-Sector

Paul, Chris, Andy, Tom and Heather went to Scandinavia to learn about what the Swedes and Danes are doing about climate change.

In two sessions, we’ll present what we learned in visiting buildings, building professionals, city officials, and researchers in these two countries, and how it may or may not relate to our efforts here at home.

Andy Shapiro

Andy Shapiro

 

To learn more about NESEA’s BuildingEnergy 15 conference and see more speakers and programs, follow THIS LINK.

January 27 Energy News

Headline News:

  • A new study has found that wave energy production, once the infrastructure is in place, would be a reliable, steady, and dependable source of electricity—even cheaper than wind power. Along the US coastline, it could make 1,170 TWh per year. That is enough to supply half the United States’ annual electricity demand. [TakePart]
  • Global warming may boost the frequency of extreme and devastating La Niña events, a study released suggests. It says that as the climate warms, extreme La Niña events will occur almost twice as often as they do now, causing heavy flooding in some places, droughts in others, and increasingly intense storms. [NBCNews.com]
  • The largest concentrated solar power project in the Middle East, Shams 1, has performed better than expected, the Shams Power Company has reported. The company had expected to generate about 193,000 MWh electricity in 2014 but managed to generate just under 215,000 MWh, 12% over expected generation.  [CleanTechnica]
  • The underlying theme of the agreements the US made with China and India, and the position taken by the leaders of the world’s three most influential national economies, is that coal no longer rules. The “all of the above” credo that once dominated their thinking on energy is morphing into “anything but coal.” [RenewEconomy]
  • The UK Government has been forced to perform a U-turn and concede to a number of Opposition amendments to squeeze through legislation that will allow shale gas development to go ahead. Ministers had to accept the 13 conditions laid out by Labour watering down fracking laws to pass them through Parliament. [Click Green]

For more news, please visit geoharvey - Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

NESEA Speakers at BuildingEnergy 15: Paul Francisco

Paul Francisco

Is it All Hot Air: Ventilating Homes, Why? How Much? and How?

Wednesday, March 04, 2015
2:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Single Family

Why do we need to ventilate homes? How much air do we need to do it? Once we’ve figured that out, what systems should we install? These are big questions, but this session will hopefully provide useful answers. We’ll begin with a discussion of health impacts of ventilation and different ventilation rates. The latter part will explore various ventilation systems: pros and cons, costs and benefits, and tips for installing the best systems for your project.

To learn more about NESEA’s BuildingEnergy 15 conference and see more speakers and programs, follow THIS LINK.